Category: vegetarian

Before Honen and Shinran’s time, Buddhism in J…

Before Honen and Shinran’s time, Buddhism in Japan was mainly for the elites. By opening up a form of Buddhism for people like fishermen and hunters, doing their best to support their families, Buddhism became available to the common people of Japan.

Anthony Bourdain made the point that people in…

Anthony Bourdain made the point that people in the third world eat whatever they can get, and don’t have the luxury of choosing a vegetarian diet. When the nutrients in meat aren’t as easily found in other sources, then perhaps we shouldn’t judge, especially if a country eats much less meat than the West does.

Do Buddhists Eat Meat?

matthewsatori:

I’ve been eating a mostly vegetarian diet for about the last eight months. I would like to incorporate meat back into my diet, while nonetheless eating healthier than before.

In the typical American diet, we eat too much red meat and junk food, and not enough fruits and vegetables. The typical Asian diet is healthier in comparison:

Folks in Asian countries tend to have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and obesity than Americans do, and they typically live longer, too. Researchers suspect that owes largely to their diet: a low-fat, healthy eating style that emphasizes rice, vegetables, fresh fruit and fish, with very little red meat.
https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/traditional-asian-diet

While vegetarianism is a noble lifestyle choice, is there a way we can reduce the cruelty and environmental destruction of the livestock industry without insisting for the general population to give up meat entirely?

If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely? These are honest questions without easy answers:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2016/12/23/how-humans-evolved-to-be-natural-omnivores/1#4882b1837af5

While it’s often assumed that Buddhism in general is vegetarian, this is not inherently the case:

Vegetarianism was not a part of the early Buddhist tradition and the Buddha himself was not a vegetarian. The Buddha got his food either by going on alms rounds or by being invited to the houses of his supporters and in both cases he ate what he was given. Before his enlightenment he had experimented with various diets including a meatless diet, but he eventually abandoned them believing that they did not contribute to spiritual development.

The Nipata Sutta underlines this point when it says that it is immorality that makes one impure (morally and spiritually), not the eating of meat. The Buddha is often described as eating meat, he recommended meat broth as a cure for certain types of illness and advised monks for practical reasons, to avoid certain types of meat, implying that other types were quite acceptable… 

Buddhists who insist on vegetarianism have a simple and compelling argument to support their case. Eating meat encourages an industry that causes cruelty and death to millions of animals and a truly compassionate person would wish to mitigate all this suffering. By refusing to eat meat one can do just that.

Those who believe that vegetarianism is not necessary for Buddhists have equally compelling although more complex arguments to support their view. 

(1) If the Buddha had felt that a meatless diet was in accordance with the Precepts he would have said so and in the Pali Tipitaka at least, he did not. 

(2) Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non- vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian. The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures). 

(3) While the vegetarian will not eat meat he does use numerous other products that lead to animals being killed (soap, leather, serum, silk etc.) Why abstain from one while using the others? 

(4) Good qualities like understanding, patience, generosity and honesty and bad qualities like ignorance, pride, hypocrisy, jealousy and indifference do not depend on what one eats and therefore diet is not a significant factor in spiritual development. 

Some will accept one point of view and some another. Each person has to make up his or her own mind.
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd21.htm

image

If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely?

Do Buddhists Eat Meat?

matthewsatori:

I’ve been eating a mostly vegetarian diet for about the last eight months. I would like to incorporate meat back into my diet, while nonetheless eating healthier than before.

In the typical American diet, we eat too much red meat and junk food, and not enough fruits and vegetables.  The typical Asian diet is healthier in comparison:

Folks in Asian countries tend to have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and obesity than Americans do, and they typically live longer, too. Researchers suspect that owes largely to their diet: a low-fat, healthy eating style that emphasizes rice, vegetables, fresh fruit and fish, with very little red meat.
https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/traditional-asian-diet

While vegetarianism is a noble lifestyle choice, is there a way we can reduce the cruelty and environmental destruction of the livestock industry without insisting for the general population to give up meat entirely?

If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely? These are honest questions without easy answers:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2016/12/23/how-humans-evolved-to-be-natural-omnivores/1#4882b1837af5

While it’s often assumed that Buddhism in general is vegetarian, this is not inherently the case:

Vegetarianism was not a part of the early Buddhist tradition and the Buddha himself was not a vegetarian. The Buddha got his food either by going on alms rounds or by being invited to the houses of his supporters and in both cases he ate what he was given. Before his enlightenment he had experimented with various diets including a meatless diet, but he eventually abandoned them believing that they did not contribute to spiritual development.

The Nipata Sutta underlines this point when it says that it is immorality that makes one impure (morally and spiritually), not the eating of meat. The Buddha is often described as eating meat, he recommended meat broth as a cure for certain types of illness and advised monks for practical reasons, to avoid certain types of meat, implying that other types were quite acceptable… 

Buddhists who insist on vegetarianism have a simple and compelling argument to support their case. Eating meat encourages an industry that causes cruelty and death to millions of animals and a truly compassionate person would wish to mitigate all this suffering. By refusing to eat meat one can do just that.

Those who believe that vegetarianism is not necessary for Buddhists have equally compelling although more complex arguments to support their view. 

(1) If the Buddha had felt that a meatless diet was in accordance with the Precepts he would have said so and in the Pali Tipitaka at least, he did not. 

(2) Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non- vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian. The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures). 

(3) While the vegetarian will not eat meat he does use numerous other products that lead to animals being killed (soap, leather, serum, silk etc.) Why abstain from one while using the others? 

(4) Good qualities like understanding, patience, generosity and honesty and bad qualities like ignorance, pride, hypocrisy, jealousy and indifference do not depend on what one eats and therefore diet is not a significant factor in spiritual development. 

Some will accept one point of view and some another. Each person has to make up his or her own mind.
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd21.htm

image

If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely?

Do Buddhists Eat Meat?

matthewsatori:

I’ve been eating a mostly vegetarian diet for about the last eight months. I would like to incorporate meat back into my diet, while nonetheless eating healthier than before.

In the typical American diet, we eat too much red meat and junk food, and not enough fruits and vegetables.  The typical Asian diet is healthier in comparison:

Folks in Asian countries tend to have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and obesity than Americans do, and they typically live longer, too. Researchers suspect that owes largely to their diet: a low-fat, healthy eating style that emphasizes rice, vegetables, fresh fruit and fish, with very little red meat.
https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/traditional-asian-diet

While it’s often assumed that Buddhism in general is vegetarian, this is not inherently the case:

Vegetarianism was not a part of the early Buddhist tradition and the Buddha himself was not a vegetarian. The Buddha got his food either by going on alms rounds or by being invited to the houses of his supporters and in both cases he ate what he was given. Before his enlightenment he had experimented with various diets including a meatless diet, but he eventually abandoned them believing that they did not contribute to spiritual development.

The Nipata Sutta underlines this point when it says that it is immorality that makes one impure (morally and spiritually), not the eating of meat. The Buddha is often described as eating meat, he recommended meat broth as a cure for certain types of illness and advised monks for practical reasons, to avoid certain types of meat, implying that other types were quite acceptable… 

Buddhists who insist on vegetarianism have a simple and compelling argument to support their case. Eating meat encourages an industry that causes cruelty and death to millions of animals and a truly compassionate person would wish to mitigate all this suffering. By refusing to eat meat one can do just that.

Those who believe that vegetarianism is not necessary for Buddhists have equally compelling although more complex arguments to support their view. 

(1) If the Buddha had felt that a meatless diet was in accordance with the Precepts he would have said so and in the Pali Tipitaka at least, he did not. 

(2) Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non- vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian. The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures). 

(3) While the vegetarian will not eat meat he does use numerous other products that lead to animals being killed (soap, leather, serum, silk etc.) Why abstain from one while using the others? 

(4) Good qualities like understanding, patience, generosity and honesty and bad qualities like ignorance, pride, hypocrisy, jealousy and indifference do not depend on what one eats and therefore diet is not a significant factor in spiritual development. 

Some will accept one point of view and some another. Each person has to make up his or her own mind.
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd21.htm

image

Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non-vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian.
The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures).

How Humans Evolved To Be Natural Omnivores

How Humans Evolved To Be Natural Omnivores:

While vegetarianism is a noble lifestyle choice, is there a way we can reduce the cruelty and environmental destruction of the livestock industry without insisting for the general population to give up meat entirely?

If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely? These are honest questions without easy answers. 

Do Buddhists Eat Meat?

I’ve been eating a mostly vegetarian diet for about the last eight months. I would like to incorporate meat back into my diet, while nonetheless eating healthier than before.

In the typical American diet, we eat too much red meat and junk food, and not enough fruits and vegetables.  The typical Asian diet is healthier in comparison:

Folks in Asian countries tend to have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and obesity than Americans do, and they typically live longer, too. Researchers suspect that owes largely to their diet: a low-fat, healthy eating style that emphasizes rice, vegetables, fresh fruit and fish, with very little red meat.
https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/traditional-asian-diet

While it’s often assumed that Buddhism in general is vegetarian, this is not inherently the case:

Vegetarianism was not a part of the early Buddhist tradition and the Buddha himself was not a vegetarian. The Buddha got his food either by going on alms rounds or by being invited to the houses of his supporters and in both cases he ate what he was given. Before his enlightenment he had experimented with various diets including a meatless diet, but he eventually abandoned them believing that they did not contribute to spiritual development.

The Nipata Sutta underlines this point when it says that it is immorality that makes one impure (morally and spiritually), not the eating of meat. The Buddha is often described as eating meat, he recommended meat broth as a cure for certain types of illness and advised monks for practical reasons, to avoid certain types of meat, implying that other types were quite acceptable… 

Buddhists who insist on vegetarianism have a simple and compelling argument to support their case. Eating meat encourages an industry that causes cruelty and death to millions of animals and a truly compassionate person would wish to mitigate all this suffering. By refusing to eat meat one can do just that.

Those who believe that vegetarianism is not necessary for Buddhists have equally compelling although more complex arguments to support their view. 

(1) If the Buddha had felt that a meatless diet was in accordance with the Precepts he would have said so and in the Pali Tipitaka at least, he did not. 

(2) Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non- vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian. The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures). 

(3) While the vegetarian will not eat meat he does use numerous other products that lead to animals being killed (soap, leather, serum, silk etc.) Why abstain from one while using the others? 

(4) Good qualities like understanding, patience, generosity and honesty and bad qualities like ignorance, pride, hypocrisy, jealousy and indifference do not depend on what one eats and therefore diet is not a significant factor in spiritual development. 

Some will accept one point of view and some another. Each person has to make up his or her own mind.
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd21.htm

image

Myth: All Buddhists Are Vegeterian

While I am concerned about the animal mistreatment and environmental harm caused by the livestock industry, it might be unrealistic to live as 100% vegetarian when your significant other is not vegetarian. 

Please don’t feel bad if you are only “flexitarian,” since the Buddha never required 100% vegetarianism: 

Bhikshu and bhikshuni, the Sanskrit terms for a monk and a nun, literally mean a “beggar” or “mendicant.” Buddhist monks and nuns originally received their single daily meal by going on alms rounds in local villages and towns, a practice that is still followed today in some Theravada Buddhist regions of Southeast Asia. Monks and nuns were required to accept whatever the laity offered to them, including meat, since charity (dana) was the principal means for laypeople to gain merit and thus better their prospects of a happy rebirth.

The only exception to this rule recognized in the Vinaya is if a monk knows that an animal has been killed specifically to feed him, in which case he is not allowed to accept that meat. Monks were always free to choose what to eat from their bowls, but the vast majority probably ate offerings of meat.

We know that the Buddha rejected strict vegetarianism as an imperative of monastic life from a dispute with his cousin Devadatta, an ambitious monk who had sought unsuccessfully to be named the Buddha’s successor. Devadatta practiced five severe types of austerities (dhutanga), including vegetarianism, and he specifically asked the Buddha to require all monks to be strict vegetarians. The Buddha refused this request, since such a requirement would limit what monks could accept from the laity, and thus restrict the amount of merit laypeople could generate.
https://tricycle.org/trikedaily/beggars-cant-be-choosers/

NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU

This page has over 3,800 followers, with an av…

This page has over 3,800 followers, with an average of 250 new followers a month since it started in December 2016. I don’t know why you follow this page, but I hope you get something good from the experience. I am just an average guy looking for inner peace.

A Vegan Dietitian Reviews “What the Health”

A Vegan Dietitian Reviews “What the Health”:

This is vegan dietitian Virginia Messina reviewing the exaggerated health claims of What the Health. 

According to Messina, exaggerating the health benefits of a plant-based diet discredits the cause of animal rights. 

Though it would be nice to lose a few pounds, I am vegetarian mainly for religious and ethical reasons.