Category: diet

Do Buddhists Eat Meat?

matthewsatori:

I’ve been eating a mostly vegetarian diet for about the last eight months. I would like to incorporate meat back into my diet, while nonetheless eating healthier than before.

In the typical American diet, we eat too much red meat and junk food, and not enough fruits and vegetables. The typical Asian diet is healthier in comparison:

Folks in Asian countries tend to have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and obesity than Americans do, and they typically live longer, too. Researchers suspect that owes largely to their diet: a low-fat, healthy eating style that emphasizes rice, vegetables, fresh fruit and fish, with very little red meat.
https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/traditional-asian-diet

While vegetarianism is a noble lifestyle choice, is there a way we can reduce the cruelty and environmental destruction of the livestock industry without insisting for the general population to give up meat entirely?

If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely? These are honest questions without easy answers:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2016/12/23/how-humans-evolved-to-be-natural-omnivores/1#4882b1837af5

While it’s often assumed that Buddhism in general is vegetarian, this is not inherently the case:

Vegetarianism was not a part of the early Buddhist tradition and the Buddha himself was not a vegetarian. The Buddha got his food either by going on alms rounds or by being invited to the houses of his supporters and in both cases he ate what he was given. Before his enlightenment he had experimented with various diets including a meatless diet, but he eventually abandoned them believing that they did not contribute to spiritual development.

The Nipata Sutta underlines this point when it says that it is immorality that makes one impure (morally and spiritually), not the eating of meat. The Buddha is often described as eating meat, he recommended meat broth as a cure for certain types of illness and advised monks for practical reasons, to avoid certain types of meat, implying that other types were quite acceptable… 

Buddhists who insist on vegetarianism have a simple and compelling argument to support their case. Eating meat encourages an industry that causes cruelty and death to millions of animals and a truly compassionate person would wish to mitigate all this suffering. By refusing to eat meat one can do just that.

Those who believe that vegetarianism is not necessary for Buddhists have equally compelling although more complex arguments to support their view. 

(1) If the Buddha had felt that a meatless diet was in accordance with the Precepts he would have said so and in the Pali Tipitaka at least, he did not. 

(2) Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non- vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian. The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures). 

(3) While the vegetarian will not eat meat he does use numerous other products that lead to animals being killed (soap, leather, serum, silk etc.) Why abstain from one while using the others? 

(4) Good qualities like understanding, patience, generosity and honesty and bad qualities like ignorance, pride, hypocrisy, jealousy and indifference do not depend on what one eats and therefore diet is not a significant factor in spiritual development. 

Some will accept one point of view and some another. Each person has to make up his or her own mind.
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd21.htm

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If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely?

Do Buddhists Eat Meat?

matthewsatori:

I’ve been eating a mostly vegetarian diet for about the last eight months. I would like to incorporate meat back into my diet, while nonetheless eating healthier than before.

In the typical American diet, we eat too much red meat and junk food, and not enough fruits and vegetables.  The typical Asian diet is healthier in comparison:

Folks in Asian countries tend to have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and obesity than Americans do, and they typically live longer, too. Researchers suspect that owes largely to their diet: a low-fat, healthy eating style that emphasizes rice, vegetables, fresh fruit and fish, with very little red meat.
https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/traditional-asian-diet

While vegetarianism is a noble lifestyle choice, is there a way we can reduce the cruelty and environmental destruction of the livestock industry without insisting for the general population to give up meat entirely?

If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely? These are honest questions without easy answers:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2016/12/23/how-humans-evolved-to-be-natural-omnivores/1#4882b1837af5

While it’s often assumed that Buddhism in general is vegetarian, this is not inherently the case:

Vegetarianism was not a part of the early Buddhist tradition and the Buddha himself was not a vegetarian. The Buddha got his food either by going on alms rounds or by being invited to the houses of his supporters and in both cases he ate what he was given. Before his enlightenment he had experimented with various diets including a meatless diet, but he eventually abandoned them believing that they did not contribute to spiritual development.

The Nipata Sutta underlines this point when it says that it is immorality that makes one impure (morally and spiritually), not the eating of meat. The Buddha is often described as eating meat, he recommended meat broth as a cure for certain types of illness and advised monks for practical reasons, to avoid certain types of meat, implying that other types were quite acceptable… 

Buddhists who insist on vegetarianism have a simple and compelling argument to support their case. Eating meat encourages an industry that causes cruelty and death to millions of animals and a truly compassionate person would wish to mitigate all this suffering. By refusing to eat meat one can do just that.

Those who believe that vegetarianism is not necessary for Buddhists have equally compelling although more complex arguments to support their view. 

(1) If the Buddha had felt that a meatless diet was in accordance with the Precepts he would have said so and in the Pali Tipitaka at least, he did not. 

(2) Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non- vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian. The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures). 

(3) While the vegetarian will not eat meat he does use numerous other products that lead to animals being killed (soap, leather, serum, silk etc.) Why abstain from one while using the others? 

(4) Good qualities like understanding, patience, generosity and honesty and bad qualities like ignorance, pride, hypocrisy, jealousy and indifference do not depend on what one eats and therefore diet is not a significant factor in spiritual development. 

Some will accept one point of view and some another. Each person has to make up his or her own mind.
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd21.htm

image

If humans are natural omnivores, would we lack compassion for our fellow human beings by insisting for others to give up meat entirely?

Do Buddhists Eat Meat?

matthewsatori:

I’ve been eating a mostly vegetarian diet for about the last eight months. I would like to incorporate meat back into my diet, while nonetheless eating healthier than before.

In the typical American diet, we eat too much red meat and junk food, and not enough fruits and vegetables.  The typical Asian diet is healthier in comparison:

Folks in Asian countries tend to have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and obesity than Americans do, and they typically live longer, too. Researchers suspect that owes largely to their diet: a low-fat, healthy eating style that emphasizes rice, vegetables, fresh fruit and fish, with very little red meat.
https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/traditional-asian-diet

While it’s often assumed that Buddhism in general is vegetarian, this is not inherently the case:

Vegetarianism was not a part of the early Buddhist tradition and the Buddha himself was not a vegetarian. The Buddha got his food either by going on alms rounds or by being invited to the houses of his supporters and in both cases he ate what he was given. Before his enlightenment he had experimented with various diets including a meatless diet, but he eventually abandoned them believing that they did not contribute to spiritual development.

The Nipata Sutta underlines this point when it says that it is immorality that makes one impure (morally and spiritually), not the eating of meat. The Buddha is often described as eating meat, he recommended meat broth as a cure for certain types of illness and advised monks for practical reasons, to avoid certain types of meat, implying that other types were quite acceptable… 

Buddhists who insist on vegetarianism have a simple and compelling argument to support their case. Eating meat encourages an industry that causes cruelty and death to millions of animals and a truly compassionate person would wish to mitigate all this suffering. By refusing to eat meat one can do just that.

Those who believe that vegetarianism is not necessary for Buddhists have equally compelling although more complex arguments to support their view. 

(1) If the Buddha had felt that a meatless diet was in accordance with the Precepts he would have said so and in the Pali Tipitaka at least, he did not. 

(2) Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non- vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian. The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures). 

(3) While the vegetarian will not eat meat he does use numerous other products that lead to animals being killed (soap, leather, serum, silk etc.) Why abstain from one while using the others? 

(4) Good qualities like understanding, patience, generosity and honesty and bad qualities like ignorance, pride, hypocrisy, jealousy and indifference do not depend on what one eats and therefore diet is not a significant factor in spiritual development. 

Some will accept one point of view and some another. Each person has to make up his or her own mind.
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd21.htm

image

Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non-vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian.
The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures).

Do Buddhists Eat Meat?

I’ve been eating a mostly vegetarian diet for about the last eight months. I would like to incorporate meat back into my diet, while nonetheless eating healthier than before.

In the typical American diet, we eat too much red meat and junk food, and not enough fruits and vegetables.  The typical Asian diet is healthier in comparison:

Folks in Asian countries tend to have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and obesity than Americans do, and they typically live longer, too. Researchers suspect that owes largely to their diet: a low-fat, healthy eating style that emphasizes rice, vegetables, fresh fruit and fish, with very little red meat.
https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/traditional-asian-diet

While it’s often assumed that Buddhism in general is vegetarian, this is not inherently the case:

Vegetarianism was not a part of the early Buddhist tradition and the Buddha himself was not a vegetarian. The Buddha got his food either by going on alms rounds or by being invited to the houses of his supporters and in both cases he ate what he was given. Before his enlightenment he had experimented with various diets including a meatless diet, but he eventually abandoned them believing that they did not contribute to spiritual development.

The Nipata Sutta underlines this point when it says that it is immorality that makes one impure (morally and spiritually), not the eating of meat. The Buddha is often described as eating meat, he recommended meat broth as a cure for certain types of illness and advised monks for practical reasons, to avoid certain types of meat, implying that other types were quite acceptable… 

Buddhists who insist on vegetarianism have a simple and compelling argument to support their case. Eating meat encourages an industry that causes cruelty and death to millions of animals and a truly compassionate person would wish to mitigate all this suffering. By refusing to eat meat one can do just that.

Those who believe that vegetarianism is not necessary for Buddhists have equally compelling although more complex arguments to support their view. 

(1) If the Buddha had felt that a meatless diet was in accordance with the Precepts he would have said so and in the Pali Tipitaka at least, he did not. 

(2) Unless one actually kills an animal oneself (which seldom happens today) by eating meat one is not directly responsible for the animal’s death and in this sense the non- vegetarian is no different from the vegetarian. The latter can only eat his vegetables because the farmer has ploughed his fields (thus killing many creatures) and sprayed the crop (again killing many creatures). 

(3) While the vegetarian will not eat meat he does use numerous other products that lead to animals being killed (soap, leather, serum, silk etc.) Why abstain from one while using the others? 

(4) Good qualities like understanding, patience, generosity and honesty and bad qualities like ignorance, pride, hypocrisy, jealousy and indifference do not depend on what one eats and therefore diet is not a significant factor in spiritual development. 

Some will accept one point of view and some another. Each person has to make up his or her own mind.
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd21.htm

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The Truth About Eggs

matthewsatori:

Egg whites are an excellent source of protein for those on a low-fat vegetarian diet, since they contain over 50% of an egg’s protein, without the fat and cholesterol. All of the egg’s fat and cholesterol are contained in the yolk.

Since it’s extremely unlikely that the eggs you buy at the grocery store are fertilized, I consider them a vegetarian food. It’s even more unlikely that the eggs you buy have self-fertilized through parthenogenesis:

Farmers typically collect and refrigerate eggs as soon as possible. Refrigeration completely halts the development of a fertilized egg, resulting in no noticeable difference between these and unfertilized eggs in appearance, taste, texture or nutritional value. Even when they are not refrigerated, fertilized eggs rarely develop into embryos because they require very specific conditions to do so. In fact, legal restrictions prevent farmers in North America from selling eggs that house developing embryos. Although it is clear that eggs are almost always purely vegetarian, your decision of whether or not to eat them depends on how you define the limits of your vegetarian diet.
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/can-eat-eggs-vegetarian-9307.html

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Farmers typically collect and refrigerate eggs as soon as possible. Refrigeration completely halts the development of a fertilized egg, resulting in no noticeable difference between these and unfertilized eggs in appearance, taste, texture or nutritional value. Even when they are not refrigerated, fertilized eggs rarely develop into embryos because they require very specific conditions to do so.

I’ve only had this page for around nine months, and I already…

I’ve only had this page for around nine months, and I already have over two thousand followers. 

I don’t know if that’s good or bad for Buddhism and vegetarianism, especially since so many of my followers appear to be porno accounts. 

Oh, well… 

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…at least Tumblr’s better than Pumpers.

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Absence of Meat Makes the Heart Grow Stronger

Absence of Meat Makes the Heart Grow Stronger:

Studies show that heavy consumption of meat, eggs and dairy products significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular problems. On the flip side, consuming plant-based foods such as beans, nuts, whole grains, fruits and vegetables is associated with a sharply reduced risk. 

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that compared with meat-eaters, vegetarians have a 32 percent lower risk of heart disease.
When it comes to heart disease, food isn’t just a preventative medicine. It can even be a cure. 

Back in 1998, Dr. Dean Ornish, whose signature diet is consistently ranked the top for heart health today, shocked the medical community when he found that patients put on a plant-based diet reversed their heart disease. That is, they essentially cured themselves by changing what they ate and adjusting their lifestyle. 

His and other studies show this treatment comes with only positive side effects, too: significant, lasting weight loss, lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure, lower risk of diabetes and, for men, even freedom from the little blue pill.

Previously, I was only purchasing fat-free salad dressing, until…

Previously, I was only purchasing fat-free salad dressing, until I learned that certain vitamins are fat-soluble, and that plant fats are healthier than animal fats.  

Now I take a bottle of regular salad dressing, and dilute it with vinegar to cut the calories. With fat-free dressings, you’re basically paying for water, sugar and/or corn syrup. 

Why Am I Vegetarian?

matthewsatori:

I’ve been eating a plant-based diet for almost two months now, while supplementing my diet with egg whites and low-fat dairy products for protein, calcium, and B12, and I’ve lost my desire for meat in the process.   

While it would be nice to lose a few pounds, I am mostly doing this for my long-term health, rather than short-term weight loss. While keto-based diets might help with short-term weight loss, they’re hazardous to long-term health.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America, which is caused by saturated fat and cholesterol, according to most experts. Prostate and colon cancer, also leading causes of death, are also linked to meat consumption.

Another reason for my vegetarianism is Buddhism. While the Buddha didn’t require vegetarianism, he nonetheless taught that it’s misconduct to kill animals for meat or to profit from the killing of animals for meat.

I am not going to judge others for making their own choices, though I do recommend people educate themselves on the suffering and disease of factory-farmed animals, and how that might affect the quality of meat:
http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-scared-animals-taste-worse

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While it would be nice to lose a few pounds, I am mostly doing this for my long-term health, rather than short-term weight loss. While keto-based diets might help with short-term weight loss, they’re hazardous to long-term health.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America, which is caused by saturated fat and cholesterol, according to most experts. Prostate and colon cancer, also leading causes of death, are also linked to meat consumption.

Why Am I Vegetarian?

I’ve been eating a plant-based diet for almost two months now, while supplementing my diet with egg whites and low-fat dairy products for protein, calcium, and B12, and I’ve lost my desire for meat in the process.   

While it would be nice to lose a few pounds, I am mostly doing this for my long-term health. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America, which is caused by saturated fat and cholesterol, according to most experts.

Another reason for my vegetarianism is Buddhism. While the Buddha didn’t require vegetarianism, he nonetheless taught that it’s misconduct to kill animals for meat or to profit from the killing of animals for meat.

I am not going to judge others for making their own choices, though I do recommend people educate themselves on the suffering and disease of factory-farmed animals, and how that might affect the quality of meat:
http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-scared-animals-taste-worse

image