Category: buddha

Thus as a mother with her life Will guard her …

Thus as a mother with her life
Will guard her son, her only child,
Let him extend unboundedly
His heart to every living being.
And so with love for all the world
Let him extend unboundedly
His heart, above, below, around,
Unchecked, with no ill will or hate.

Zen points directly to the human heart, see in…

Zen points directly to the human heart, see into your nature and become Buddha.

Is the Pure Land Here & Now?

In terms of whether the Pure Land is after death or here and now, these words of the Buddha are helpful:

‘With his heart thus unhostile and unafflicted by ill will, thus
undefiled and unified, a noble disciple here and now acquires these
four comforts. He thinks: ‘If there is another world and there is fruit
and ripening of actions well done and ill done, then it is possible that
on the dissolution of the body, after death, I might be reborn in a
heavenly world.’ This is the first comfort acquired. ‘But if there is no
other world and there is no fruit and ripening of actions well done
and ill done, then here and now in this life I shall be free from hostility,
affliction and anxiety, and I shall live happily.’

https://books.google.com/books?id=7AO9OLr2oJEC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

Seeking to live in the Pure Land here and now, through the dual practice of Ch’an (Zen) and Pure Land, need not deny the existence of a Pure Land after death.

Yet if our true nature is the same as Amida Buddha’s, then we can here and now be free from hostility, affliction and anxiety through the mindful recitation of Amida’s name. 

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NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU

Zen & Pure Land

matthewsatori:

The relationship with Chinese “Chan” Buddhism (Zen) is long and complicated, but by the time of the Ming Dynasty (明朝), Chan and Pure Land Buddhism slowly converged into two sides of the same “Chinese Buddhism”. This in turn influenced China’s neighbors of Korea and Vietnam.

To illustrate this point, Buddhist authors in late-medieval China and Vietnam frequently describe Pure Land Buddhism’s practice of reciting the Buddha’s name in terms of three levels:

Mundane, regular level: reciting the Buddha’s name to achieve rebirth in the Pure Land.
Middle-level: reciting the Buddha’s name to “bring out” the Buddha within the practitioner.
High-level: reciting the Buddha’s name with the understanding that there is no Buddha outside the mind.

Examples of these teachings include Tue Trung (Tuệ Trung Thượng Sĩ) in Vietnam and Ou-I in China.

The point is that the “ultimate” teaching of Pure Land Buddhism has nothing to do with an external refuge, but that the Pure Land is the mind itself, and is synonymous with Chan (Zen) teachings in Chinese Buddhism.
https://klingonbuddhist.wordpress.com/2014/02/16/a-look-at-chinese-pure-land-buddhism/

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NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU

High-level: reciting the Buddha’s name with the understanding that there is no Buddha outside the mind.

The Combined Practice of Zen & Pure Land

The relationship with Chinese “Chan” Buddhism (Zen) is long and complicated, but by the time of the Ming Dynasty (明朝), Chan and Pure Land Buddhism slowly converged into two sides of the same “Chinese Buddhism”. This in turn influenced China’s neighbors of Korea and Vietnam.

To illustrate this point, Buddhist authors in late-medieval China and Vietnam frequently describe Pure Land Buddhism’s practice of reciting the Buddha’s name in terms of three levels:

Mundane, regular level: reciting the Buddha’s name to achieve rebirth in the Pure Land.
Middle-level: reciting the Buddha’s name to “bring out” the Buddha within the practitioner.
High-level: reciting the Buddha’s name with the understanding that there is no Buddha outside the mind.

Examples of these teachings include Tue Trung (Tuệ Trung Thượng Sĩ) in Vietnam and Ou-I in China.

The point is that the “ultimate” teaching of Pure Land Buddhism has nothing to do with an external refuge, but that the Pure Land is the mind itself, and is synonymous with Chan (Zen) teachings in Chinese Buddhism.
https://klingonbuddhist.wordpress.com/2014/02/16/a-look-at-chinese-pure-land-buddhism/

NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU

The Buddha’s Last Words

matthewsatori:

The Buddha’s last words were to be a lamp unto yourself, seeking no external refuge. How do we square this with the Nembutsu, since Namu-Amida-Butsu means “I take refuge in Amida Buddha”? 

The name Amida means “boundless light.” Amida, rather than an external refuge, is the boundless light of our own Buddha-nature. In reciting the Nembutsu, we awaken to the True Self, the lamp within. 

Rather than a literal flesh and blood man who attained Buddhahood ten kalpas ago, billions of Buddha-lands to the west, Amida is Dharma-body itself, the Buddha-nature in all things and beings. 

image

NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU

The name Amida means “boundless light.” Amida, rather than an external refuge, is the boundless light of our own Buddha-nature. In reciting the Nembutsu, we awaken to the True Self, the lamp within.

Is Amida Buddha a God?

matthewsatori:

Amida Buddha is not a theistic god. In reciting the name of Amida Buddha, and bowing to his statue on the altar, we seek to realize Amida as our true Buddha-self: 

So the question becomes, “what does the statue of Buddha represent?” Buddhism is a non-theistic religion, so, by definition, idolatry can’t be an issue here. 

In Zen, we usually say that we are bowing to our own Buddha Nature, that higher aspect of ourselves which we have in common with all other beings. 

When we bow, we are reminding ourselves of our inborn enlightenment, which our greed, hate, and delusion keep us from realizing, and making a renewed commitment to become what we truly are. 
http://www.chzc.org/bowing.htm 

Amida Buddha is a mirror into our own Buddha-nature:

image

NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU

In Zen, we usually say that we are bowing to our own Buddha Nature, that higher aspect of ourselves which we have in common with all other beings.

Is Amida Buddha a God?

Amida Buddha is not a theistic god. In reciting the name of Amida Buddha, and bowing to his statue on the altar, we seek to realize Amida as our true Buddha-self: 

So the question becomes, “what does the statue of Buddha represent?” Buddhism is a non-theistic religion, so, by definition, idolatry can’t be an issue here. 

In Zen, we usually say that we are bowing to our own Buddha Nature, that higher aspect of ourselves which we have in common with all other beings. 

When we bow, we are reminding ourselves of our inborn enlightenment, which our greed, hate, and delusion keep us from realizing, and making a renewed commitment to become what we truly are. 
http://www.chzc.org/bowing.htm 

Amida Buddha is a mirror into our own Buddha-nature:

image

NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU

Photo

Photo

Nirvana Day 2018: why millions of Buddhists wi…

Nirvana Day 2018: why millions of Buddhists will be meditating today:

matthewsatori:

February 15th is Nirvana Day, when the Buddha passed away into final Nirvana. 

It is a time to reflect on the impermanence of life, and on why the Buddha appeared in the world.