Buddhism is not blind dogmatism…

The first practice of the Eightfold Path is right view, because of how difficult it is to practice the rest of the path if we start out with a wrong view of reality. 

Part of right view is non-attachment to views, that the Buddha’s teachings aren’t to be fetishized to the point of lacking compassion on others who view things differently:

Aware of the suffering created by attachment to views and wrong perceptions, we are determined to avoid being narrow-minded and bound to present views. We are committed to learning and practicing nonattachment from views and being open to other’s insights and experiences in order to benefit from the collective wisdom. Insight is revealed through the practice of compassionate listening, deep looking, and letting go of notions rather than through the accumulation of intellectual knowledge. We are aware that the knowledge we presently possess is not changeless, absolute truth. Truth is found in life, and we will observe life within and around us in every moment, ready to learn throughout our lives.
https://plumvillage.org/mindfulness-practice/the-14-mindfulness-trainings/

The Buddha’s parable of the blind men and the elephant is on the importance of non-attachment to views: 

O how they cling and wrangle, some who claim
For preacher and monk the honored name!
For, quarreling, each to his view they cling.
Such folk see only one side of a thing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_men_and_an_elephant#Buddhist

As explained by the Buddha in his parable of the poisoned arrow, living the teachings in one’s daily life is more important than holding to metaphysical beliefs: 

The Buddha always told his disciples not to waste their time and energy in metaphysical speculation. Whenever he was asked a metaphysical question, he remained silent. Instead, he directed his disciples toward practical efforts. Questioned one day about the problem of the infinity of the world, the Buddha said, “Whether the world is finite or infinite, limited or unlimited, the problem of your liberation remains the same.” Another time he said, “Suppose a man is struck by a poisoned arrow and the doctor wishes to take out the arrow immediately. Suppose the man does not want the arrow removed until he knows who shot it, his age, his parents, and why he shot it. What would happen? If he were to wait until all these questions have been answered, the man might die first.” Life is so short. It must not be spent in endless metaphysical speculation that does not bring us any closer to the truth.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_Poisoned_Arrow

image

NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU